garcode:

Digital Artefacts by Bart Hess presented at Architecture Triennale in Lisbon: ”A body plunges into the liquid; a crust of wax crystallises around its curves and folds, growing architectural forms, layer by layer.”

"Our bodies are end­lessly photographed, monitored and laser scanned with millimetre precision. From this context of surveillance, facial recognition, avatars and virtual ghosts, we imagine a near future where digital static, distortions and glitches become a new form of ornament. For the youth tribes of future perfect the body is a site for adaption, augmentation and experimentation. They celebrate the corrup­tion of the body data by moulding within their costumery all the imperfections of a decaying scan file. Shimmering in the exhibition landscape is a network of geometric reflec­tive pools of molten wax. Their mirrored surface is broken by a body, suspended from a robotic harness, plunging into the liquid. A crust of wax crystallises around its curves and folds, growing architectural forms, layer by layer, like a 3D printer drawing directly onto the skin. Slowly the body emerges, encased in a dripping wet readymade prosthetic. It is a physical glitch, a manifestation of corrupt data in motion, a digital artefact. They hang from hooks like a collection of strange beasts and frozen avatars. body prints, imperfect and distorted and always utterly unique." - Bart Hess via

(Source: vogueanon, via vazelodian)

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South Korean label Ordinary People's F/W 2013 collection.

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Madewell's menswear-inspired Fall 2013 collection is making us crave for the colder months.

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Drape Analysis of a Balenciaga Jacket

thecuttingclass:

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Balenciaga, AW13, Paris.

Sometimes it is worthwhile focusing on some of the more subtle pieces of a collection and understanding how they are formed in order to learn from the way they are constructed. The following example diagrams deconstruct the pattern shapes that may have been used for this Balenciaga jacket to examine how the careful draping has been formed.

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(Source: stopdropandvogue, via lbardugo)

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"I hate the notion that style is about expressing your individuality, when it is and always has been about a whole bunch of connections among yourself and others involved in your choices, abilities, finances, skills, tastes, and ways the garments came into existence and into your sphere of tangible reality. I’m not denying that some of us are born special and despite dire circumstances came out with above average taste. But there were entry points and influences every step of the way. And, we all face limitations. Our lives bear witness to the connections that brought us to this particular present."

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Model Cameron Russell gives an insightful TED talk on the realities of modelling.

We say, “It’s really amazing to travel, and it’s amazing to get to work with creative, inspired, passionate people.” And those things are true, but they’re only one half of the story, because the thing that we never say on camera, that I have never said on camera, is, “I am insecure.” And I’m insecure because I have to think about what I look like every day. And if you ever are wondering, “If I have thinner thighs and shinier hair, will I be happier?” you just need to meet a group of models, because they have the thinnest thighs and the shiniest hair and the coolest clothes, and they’re the most physically insecure women probably on the planet.

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The story of Humberto, Carol, and Opening Ceremony.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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edithshead:

the WORN FASHION JOURNAL INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN - pass it on!

Fashion, to a whole lot of people, is wrapped up part-and-parcel with the Fashion Industry, purveyor of skinny models, overpriced labels, and the incessant marketing of superficial lifestyle branding. It’s about making you dissatisfied with what you have.

But fashion is something else, too. It is peasant costume, military uniform, and youthful rebellion. It is beautiful, ugly, necessary and frivolous. It’s feminism. It’s tradition. It’s Salvador Dali’s surreal vision in a hat. Fashion provides a timeline, and creates markers of belief and custom. It is an outward representation of internal things difficult to express. 

And underneath all of those intangibles, there is design and structure and skill and craft - changing and evolving, never the same from age to age.

WORN explores the personal stories, histories, cultures and subcultures of style. It revels in the joy and creativity of getting dressed. It’s about realizing style is not a single image, but an individual response to the world around us.

Support independent fashion publishing: support WORN. 

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Two days ago Amanda and I had the chance to watch Mass Exodus, the annual runway show featuring collections from Ryerson’s fourth-year fashion design students.

This being my first year in attendance, I didn’t expect to see such a great breadth of designs, all with varying cuts, fabrics, and styles, within a span of just one hour. It was overwhelming, in a good way.
Still, I couldn’t help but wish the show went on for a few more hours. Sixty minutes was simply not enough to give all 58 collections the appreciation and attention they deserved. The construction of many of the pieces were just so good it was hard to keep my constant exclamations of I’d so wear that! to myself (sorry Amanda).

Aside from those in the photos, other notable designers whose work stood out to me include Kendra Pegg with her androgynous ensembles, Alexandra Boultzi’s troupe of Japanese warrior women, Lia Valdez's highly provocative fetish pieces, Monica Saraguro's lace-fur-and-leather collection, Kelli Kikcio's menswear, and Alexandria Julian's cast of Little Mermaid ballet dancers, complete with a tights-clad prince!

Thanks to the Mass Exodus crew, you can watch a live stream of the whole show right here and see photos on Flare.com.

(Source: hereishazel.com)

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This fashion log is maintained by Hazel Llanes, a design student from Toronto, Canada.

Here is where she will analyze current trends, follow runway shows, feature some simple D.I.Y's and discuss the relevance of style in our current world.

Theme by Monique Tendencia & modified by Hazel Llanes.